University of Pennsylvania (Core Engineering Coursework):

  • CIS 390: Robotics Perception and Planning (Fall 2016)
    • Algorithms for planning and perception will be studied and implemented on actual robots. While planning is a fundamental problem in artificial intelligence and decision making, robot planning refers to finding a path from A to B in the presence of obstacles and by complying with the kinematic constraints of the robot. Perception involves the estimation of the robots motion and path as well as the shape of the environment from sensors. In this course, algorithms will be implemented in Python on mobile platforms on ground and in the air.
  • MEAM 302: Fluid Mechanics (Fall 2016)
    • Physical properties; fluid statics; Bernoulli equation; fluid kinematics; conservation laws and finite control-volume analysis; conservation laws and differential analysis; inviscid flow; The Navier-Stokes equation and some exact solutions; similitude, dimensional analysis, and modeling; flow in pipes and channels; boundary layer theory; lift and drag.
  • MEAM 347: Mechanical Engineering Design Laboratory (Fall 2016)
    • This is a junior level laboratory course. The course teaches the principles of design and measurement systems including basic electromechanical systems. It follows MEAM 302 and MEAM 321 including experiments in fluid mechanics, and vibration in the design of mechanical systems.
  • MEAM 354: Solid Mechanics (Fall 2016)
    • This course builds on the fundamentals of solid mechanics taught in MEAM 210 and addresses more advanced problems in strength of materials. The students will be exposed to a wide array of applications from traditional engineering disciplines as well as emerging areas such as biotechnology and nanotechnology. The methods of analysis developed in this course will form the cornerstone of machine design and also more advanced topics in the mechanics of materials.
  • MEAM 520: Robotics (Fall 2016)
    • The rapidly evolving field of robotics includes systems designed to replace, assist, or even entertain humans in a wide variety of tasks. Recent examples include human-friendly robot arms for manufacturing, interactive robotic pets, medical and surgical assistive robots, and semi-autonomous search-and-rescue vehicles. This course presents the fundamental kinematic, dynamic, and computational principles underlying most modern robotic systems. The main topics of the course include: rotation matrices, homogeneous transformations, manipulator forward kinematics, manipulator inverse kinematics, jacobians, path and trajectory planning, sensing and actuation, feedback control, haptic interfaces, and teleoperation. The material is reinforced with hands-on lab exercises involving a robotic arm and a haptic interface.

  • MEAM 203: Thermodynamics (Spring 2016)
    • Thermodynamics is the study of the fundamental concepts underlying the conversion of energy in such mechanical systems as internal and external combustion engines (including automobile and aircraft engines), compressors, pumps, refrigerators, and turbines. This course is intended for students in mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, materials science, physics and other fields. The topics include: Basic definitions, microscopic and macroscopic points of view; properties of pure substances and reversibility and irreversibility, the thermodynamic temperature scale, entropy, availability, second law analysis, power and refrigeration cycles and their engineering applications.
  • MEAM 211: Dynamics (Spring 2016)
    • This course introduces the basic concepts in kinematics and dynamics that are necessary to understand, analyze and design mechanisms and machines. These concepts are also fundamental to the modeling and analysis of human movement, biomechanics, animation of synthetic human models and robotics. The topics covered include: Particle dynamics using energy and momentum methods of analysis; Dynamics of systems of particles; Impact; Systems of variable mass; Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies in plane motion; Computer-aided dynamic simulation and animation.
  • MEAM 248: Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I (Spring 2016)
    • This is the second of a two-semester sophomore level laboratory sequence that students complete over the fall and spring semesters. The course teaches the principles of experimentation and measurement as well as analysis and application to design. The spring semester course follows closely with MEAM 203 and MEAM 211, expanding upon the principles of experimentation, measurement, analysis, and design of systems through hands-on laboratories and projects in thermodynamics and dynamics.
  • MEAM 514: Design for Manufacturability (Spring 2016)
    • This course is aimed at providing current and future product design/development engineers, manufacturing engineers, and product development managers with an applied understanding of Design for Manufacturability (DFM) concepts and methods. The course content includes materials from multiple disciplines including: engineering design, manufacturing, marketing, finance, project management, and quality systems.
  • ENM 251: Analytical Methods for Engineering (Spring 2016)
    • This course introduces students to physical models and mathematical methods that are widely encountered in various branches of engineering. Illustrative examples are used to motivate mathematical topics including ordinary and partial differential equations, Fourier analysis, eigenvalue problems, and stability analysis. Analytical techniques that yield exact solutions to problems are developed when possible, but in many cases, numerical calculations are employed using programs such as Matlab and Maple. Students will learn the importance of mathematics in engineering.


       

  • ESE 505: Feedback Control Design and Analysis (Fall 2015)
    • Basic methods for analysis and design of feedback control in systems. Applications to practical systems. Methods presented include time response analysis, frequency response analysis, root locus, Nyquist and Bode plots, and the state-space approach.
  • EAS 205: Applications of Scientific Computing (Fall 2015)
    • This course will discuss a number of canonical problems and show how numerical methods are used to solve them. Lectures will introduce the underlying theory and the relevant numerical methods. Students will be expected to implement solutions to the problems using MATLAB. The course will use the visualization capabilities of MATLAB to provide students with a geometric interpretation of the key ideas underlying the numerical methods. Topics to be covered will include: The solution of systems of linear systems equations with application to problems such as force balance analysis and global illumination computation. Representing and computing coordinate transformations with applications to problems in graphics, vision and robotics. Transform Coding with applications to the analysis of audio signals and image compression. Analysis of variance and the search for low dimensional representations for high dimensional data sets egs. Google’s PageRank algorithm. Least Squares model fitting with applications to data analysis. Analysis of linear dynamical systems with applications to understanding the modes of vibration of mechanical systems. The analysis of stochastic systems governed by state transition matrices.
  • MEAM 210: Statics and Mechanics of Materials (Fall 2015)
    • This course is primarily intended for students in mechanical engineering, but may also be of interest to students in materials science and other fields. It continues the treatment of statics of rigid bodies begun in MEAM 110/PHYS 150 and progresses to the treatment of deformable bodies and their response to loads. The concepts of stress, strain, and linearly elastic response are introduced and applied to the behavior of rods, shafts, beams and other mechanical components. The failure and design of mechanical components are discussed.
  • MEAM 247: Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I (Fall 2015)
    • This is the first of a two semester sophomore level laboratory sequence that students complete over the fall and spring semesters. The course teaches the principles of experimentation and measurement as well as analysis and application to design. This fall semester course follows closely with MEAM 210, involving experiments to explore the principles of statics and strength of materials.

  • CIS 240: Computer Architecture (2015 Spring)
    • You know how to program, but do you know how computers really work? How do millions of transistors come together to form a complete computing system? This bottom-up course begins with transistors and simple computer hardware structures, continues with low-level programming using primative machine instructions, and finishes with an introduction to all aspects of computer systems architecture and serves as the foundation for subsequent computer systems courses. The course will consider the SPARC architecture, boolean logic, number systems,and computer arithmetic; macro assembly language programming and subroutine linkages; the operating system interface and input/output; understanding the output of the C compiler; the use of the C programming language to generate specific assembly language instructions.
  • MATH 240: Linear Algebra + Differential Equations (2015 Spring)
    • Linear algebra: vectors, matrices, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, spans, bases, and dimension, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, maxtrix exponentials. Ordinary differential equations: higher-order homogeneous and inhomogeneous ODEs and linear systems of ODEs, phase plane analysis, non-linear systems.
  • PHYS 151: Electromagnetism and Radiation (2015 Spring)
    • The topics of this calculus-based course are electric and magnetic fields; Coulomb’s, Ampere’s, and Faraday’s laws; Maxwell’s equations; emission, propagation, and absorption of electromagnetic radiation; interference, reflection, refraction, scattering, and diffraction phenomena.
  • EAS 203: Engineering Ethics (2015 Spring)
    • The practice of engineering requires more than creativity, diligence, and technical knowledge: it demands the tools to manage the conflicting needs of clients, managers, and the public; an ability to act responsibly when problems arise; and, above all, strong communication skills. This course will examine the major ethical issues associated with engineering practice while enhancing students’ technical writing. Through the study of important case studies like the Great Molasses Flood, the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, we will learn about the responsibilities of engineering professionals, as well as the causes and consequences of technological failure.

  • MATH 114: Multivariable Calculus (2014 Fall)
    • Functions of several variables, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and applications, double and triple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, vectors and vector calculus, first order ordinary differential equations. Applications to physical sciences. Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software in calculus.
  • MEAM 101: Introduction to Mechanical Design (2014 Fall)
    • This hands-on, project-based course covers the fundamentals of the modern mechanical design process, from needfinding and brainstorming to the basics of computerized manufacturing and rapid prototyping. Topics include: product definition (needfinding, observation, sketching, and brainstorming); computer-aided design (part creation, assemblies, and animation using SolidWorks); fundamental engineering design practices (material selection, dimensioning, tolerances, etc.); basic computer simulation and analysis; and rapid prototyping (laser cutter, 3-D fused-deposition modeling, and an introduction to computer-controlled machining).
  • CHEM 101: General Chemistry I (2014 Fall)
    • Basic concepts and principles of chemistry and their applications in chemistry and closely-related fields. The first term emphasizes the understanding of chemical reactions through atomic and molecular structure. This is a university level course, treating the material in sufficient depth so that students can solve chemical problems and can understand the principles involved in their solution. It includes an introduction to condensed matter. This course is suitable for majors or non-majors and is recommended to satisfy either major or preprofessional requirements for general chemistry.

Lynbrook High School (Relevant Courses):

  • AP Calculus
  • AP Statistics
  • AP Physics C: Mechanics
  • AP Computer Science
  • AP Language and Composition

 

*Course descriptions from the University of Pennsylvania Registrar